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   FACULTY PUBLICATIONS

TITLE AUTHORS
The Impact of Third-Party Indices on Global Operational Risks
Journal of Supply Chain Management
Index # CSMR – PJA001
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Kuntal Bhattacharyya
Pratim Datta
O. Felix Offodile

  The Impact of Third-Party Indices on Global Operational Risks

Authors:
Kuntal Bhattacharyya
Pratim Datta
O. Felix Offodile

Abstract: In the face of global uncertainties and a growing reliance on third-party indices to obtain a snapshot of a country’s operational risks, we explore the related questions: How accurately do third-party indices capture a country’s operational risk, and how does the operational risk of the country, in turn, affect the volume of its import and export supply chains? We examine these questions by empirically investigating 81 member countries of the World Trade Organization (WTO) using archival data collected from UN agencies, independent think tanks, the WTO, and the Economist Intelligence Unit. We use seven third-party indices to gauge a country’s internal environment and map those indices to corresponding country-specific operational risks to further understand the consequent effects of those operational risks on trading volume. Results provide strong evidence for the use of certain third-party indices in assessing operational risk. In addition, operational risks are found to negatively affect the volume of import and export supply chains, albeit in varying degrees.

Reference: Bhattacharyya, K., Datta, P., and Offodile, F. O. (2010), “The Impact of Third-Party Indices on Global Operational Risks”, Journal of Supply Chain Management, 46(4), 25-43.

Consumer Evaluations of Sale Prices:Role of the Subtraction Principle
Journal of Marketing
Index # CSMR – PJA002
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Abhijit Biswas
Sandeep Bhowmick
Abhijit Guha
Dhruv Grewal

  Consumer Evaluations of Sale Prices: Role of the Subtraction Principle

Authors:
Abhijit Biswas
Sandeep Bhowmick
Abhijit Guha
Dhruv Grewal

Abstract: How do differences in the vertical location of numeric attributes (e.g., sodium content levels, prices) affect consumers’ evaluations? We examine this question by marrying prior work in marketing with work in numeric cognition, notably the operational momentum effect. Usually, consumers use subtraction when contrasting numeric elements. Borrowing from prior work in both marketing and numeric cognition, we show that subtraction tasks seem harder when the smaller number appears above the larger number, and in such cases consumers are more likely to approximate differences (rather than do actual calculations). While making these approximations, consistent with the operational momentum effect, consumers underestimate differences, and this underestimation has a follow-on impact on evaluations. Specifically, locating an item with the lower-value attribute level, above a comparison item with a higher-value attribute level, makes consumers less likely to subtract and more likely to approximate, and thus underestimate, attribute level differences. This reduced attribute level difference estimate decreases relative evaluations in contexts in which less-is-better. A sequence of six experiments explicates the process underlying this novel information processing sequence.

Reference: Biswas, A., Bhowmick, S., Guha, A. and Grewal, D. (2013), “Consumer Evaluations of Sale Prices: Role of the Subtraction Principle”, Journal of Marketing, 77(4), 49-66.

A Heuristic Algorithm for a Chance Constrained Stochastic Program
European Journal of Operations Research
Index # CSMR – PJA003
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Concetta DePaolo
Dave Rader

  A heuristic algorithm for a chance-constrained stochastic program

Authors:
Concetta DePaolo
David Rader

Abstract: A chance constrained stochastic program is considered that arises from an application to college enrollments and in which the objective function is the expectation of a linear function of the random variables. When these random variables are independent and normally distributed with mean and variance that are linear in the decision variables, the deterministic equivalent of the problem is a non-convex nonlinear knapsack problem. The optimal solution to this problem is characterized and a greedy-type heuristic algorithm that exploits this structure is employed. Computational results show that the algorithm performs well, especially when the normal random variables are approximations of binomial random variables.

Reference: DePaolo, C. and Rader, D. (2007), “A heuristic algorithm for a chance-constrained stochastic program”, European Journal of Operational Research, 176(1), 27-45.

Innovation Returns and the Economics of Off-shored IT R&D
Strategic Outsourcing: An International Journal
Index # CSMR – PJA004
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Pratim Datta
Kuntal Bhattacharyya

  Innovation Returns and the Economics of Off-shored IT R&D

Authors:
Pratim Datta
Kuntal Bhattacharyya

Abstract: How appropriate are the innovation returns from offshored information technology (IT) research and development (R&D)? In light of the emergence and spate of IT R&D offshoring, this paper aims to investigate the mechanics of governance in attracting IT R&D inflow in offshored hosts and, more importantly, whether R&D offshoring provides instrumental and legitimate IT innovation returns (intellectual property (IP)) to outsourcing countries as investors. The authors combine the calculus of host-country governance and IT R&D inflows with IT innovation returns to the US from its offshored IT R&D investments. They argue on the basis of the golden mean – a principle of moderation where too little or too stringent governance deters IT R&D investments; more importantly, too little and too much IT R&D investments fail to stimulate IT innovation returns to the investors. An analysis of 81 World Trade Organization (WTO) countries underscores the authors’ argument that the calculus between governance and IT innovation productivity is mediated by IT R&D investments. However, the non-linear relationships between governance, R&D foreign direct investments (FDI) and patent-level returns show a threshold effect often overlooked by existing research. Together, this article points out the need for researchers to consider diminishing returns to scale from overarching emphases on governance or IT R&D over-investments. As multinational companies in developed countries increasingly offshore IT-related R&D, this investigation is relevant, current, and disconcerting – implying the need for multinationals to revisit their IT R&D offshoring strategies and priorities. Our findings do not support the “win-win” pitch for IT R&D offshoring. Instead, this research points to the fact that, while there are some economic benefits derived from R&D FDI, there are inflection points beyond which innovations returns diminish. Where the inflection point lies depends on countries as well as specific firms and industries.

Reference: Datta, P. and Bhattacharyya, K. (2012), “Innovation returns and the economics of off-shored IT R&D”, Strategic Outsourcing: An International Journal, 5(1), 15-35.

Connect Time Limits and Customer Service Levels in Dial-Up Modem Pools
Journal of Network and Systems Management
Index # CSMR – PJA005
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Paul Schikora
Michael Godfrey

  Connect Time Limits and Customer Service Levels in Dial-Up Modem Pools

Authors:
Paul Schikora
Michael Godfrey

Abstract: Managing customer service in dial-up modem operations is critical for both non-profit and for-profit dial-up modem (DMP) operators. When system operators face excess demand, they can either add capacity or adapt their management techniques to deal with their limited resources—this paper considers the latter. We examine how system operators can more efficiently utilize their resources by imposing connect time limits on their users, as well as the negative impact from such limits. We analyze the use of time limits on two key customer service measures: percent of lost customers (customers who leave the DMP system without receiving service) and percent of customers disconnected before their work is complete. The results show that imposing these limits will have distinct, non-linear impact on these measures. Interactions between several system and environmental parameters are also discussed.

Reference: Schikora, P. and Godfrey, M. (2006), “Connect Time Limits and Customer Service Levels in Dial-Up Modem Pools”, Journal of Networks and Systems Management, 14(2), 181-188.

Analysis and Classification of Problem Statements in Technology Transfer
Journal of Technology Transfer
Index # CSMR – PJA006
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Jeff Harper
R. Kelly Rainer

   Analysis and Classification of Problem Statements in Technology Transfer

Authors:
Jeff Harper
R. Kelly Rainer

Abstract: For many years, the U.S. Government has encouraged the transfer of technologies developed through taxpayer funded endeavors to the commercial sector of the U.S. economy. The Regional Technology Applications Board, based at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, is an organization with technology transfer responsibilities. The Board receives technology transfer assistance (TTA) requests from many private-sector firms. The Board relies heavily on a problem statement from the requestor of technology assistance in determining an appropriate solution to the requestor's needs. However, the problem statements contained in these requests are often vague, ambiguous, or repetitive. This study reports on a method developed to analyze and classify problem statements that have been received by the Board so that additional understanding of the nature of these problems is obtained. One thousand one hundred past problem statements were analyzed using a content analysis method. The hierarchical classification structure developed during this project includes classes, sub-classes, and sub-sub-classes, allowing for differentiation of problem statements based upon key elements contained within the statements. Previously, no method for analysis and classification of problem statements had been documented. The results of the study indicate that problem statements can be analyzed and classified. The problem statement classification structure created through this project provides a vehicle for problem statement assignment, thereby lending additional form to the problem definition process. The study also provides an understanding of the frequency and distribution of TTA problem statements received by the Board.

Reference: Harper, J.S. and Rainer, R. K. (2000), “Analysis and Classification of Problem Statements in Technology Transfer”, Journal of Technology Transfer, 25, 135-156.

EVENTS

  • SEP

    29

    APICS Trip: Clabber Girl Distribution Center

  • OCT

    9-10

    Celadon Logistics Case Competition

  • OCT

    13

    APICS Trip: Clabber Girl Manufacturing

  • OCT

    15

    CSMR Advisory Board Meeting - 2015

  • OCT

    16

    Crown Purchasing Unit meeting